Advances in Precision Medicine

Editor-in-ChiefAsadullah, Khusru

ISSN: 2424-9106 (Online)

ISSN: 2424-8592 (Print)

Journal Abbreviation: Adv Precis Med

Publication Frequency: bi-annual

Article Processing Charges (APC): Click here for more details

Publishing Model: Open Access

Journal no: 6P

About the Journal

The journal, Advances in Precision Medicine (APM) brings together all aspects of the rapidly growing field of personalized/precision medicine.

Biomarkers are a key focus of APM’s scope. In particular, papers on stratification biomarkers and companion diagnostics enabling personalized medicine are highly welcome. Other categories of biomarkers accepted for consideration include pharmacodynamic biomarkers demonstrating target engagement which are potentially useful for dose finding, safety biomarkers to exclude patients with high risk for side effects or to detect induction of adverse effects early, and disease biomarkers which can be used for diagnosis, as surrogate endpoints, or to determine early response to therapy.

All stages in Biomarker Discovery (research and development) as well as its utilization, i.e. identification, validation and application will be covered. Apart from biomarkers and according assays, novel technologies, strategic and general aspects are of interest too. This includes approaches for marker/assay/device development strategies, collaborative approaches and regulatory aspects with impact on personalized medicine. Novel therapies, even if not guided by biomarkers, may be considered if they specifically target a particular molecule and/or a special patient subpopulation. Validation studies are highly encouraged. APM will also consider publishing negative data.

The target audiences of APM are the scientific and healthcare communities of basic scientists and clinicians from academiaregulatory institutions, and industry. This includes pharmadiagnostic and device companies.

Articles include original articles, reviews, perspectives, editorials, commentaries, position papers, conference reports and letters to the editor. The journal welcomes unsolicited article proposals in all categories except for “Editorials”. Authors are encouraged to refer to APM’s “Section Policies” for more information.

APM provides a vital forum for the exchange of important information in all areas of personalized medicine and biomarker research, development and application. We are devoted to making APM a high-quality, frequently cited journal that publishes superior scholarly articles and disseminates the latest advances in the field.

Recently Published Articles

Review Articles

Lilla Landeck, Adriana Amasuno, Ignasi Pau-Charles, Khusru Asadullah
17 Views, 0 PDF Downloads

A mixture of fumaric acid esters (FAEs) is approved for the oral therapy of psoriasis. However, for a long time the active ingredient of this mixture was unknown. We reviewed the in vitro data available for the different FAEs present in the multi compound drug and elaborate how they may contribute to possible clinical effects. Although helpful overall, many in vitro data must be viewed critically because the concentrations used in the experiments exceed the plasma levels reached in patients. The data suggest that dimethylfumarate (DMF) is the most active compound, mediating the major therapeutic effect after metabolization into MMF via an according receptor expressed on target cells. Identifying the active pharmaceutical ingredient within a mixture of compounds helps to subsequently eliminate unnecessary, potentially harmful compounds. This provides a promising example for an alternative precision medicine approach in clinical practice.

PDF

Perspective Articles

Basil Harris Chaballout, Ryan Jeffry Shaw, Karin Reuter-Rice
23 Views, 34 PDF Downloads
Substitutable Medical Apps Reusable Technologies (SMART®) on Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) is an open, standards platform that allows third parties to build health applications that interact with EHR systems. This can allow for aggregation of unique data ranging from genomics to lifestyle, thereby promoting the emerging precision medicine approach. It is also the first to provide a way to successfully incorporate interoperability in EHRs and precision medicine implementation.
PDF

Original Articles

Levent Akyüz, Andreas Wilhelm, Florian Butke, Park Su-Jin, Anja Kuckuck, Hans-Dieter Volk, Gerald Grütz
214 Views, 146 PDF Downloads
The parallel analysis of multiple factors, such as cytokines, from small sample size is an interesting approach for assessment of in vivo activation signatures and functionality after ex vivo stimulation. One interesting application is for therapy monitoring, such as safety data, pharmacodynamics, evidences for mode-of-action and side effects, particularly useful for accompanying early phase clinical trials. There are different platforms for Multiplex analysis of ligands available. We compared in this study the performance of three different platforms (Luminex Bio-Plex® 200, MesoScale Discovery®, Ella®) which use different ways of achieving parallel measurements of biomarkers from small liquid sample size. We show examples of in house assessment of intra- and inter-assay variations, determination of range and recovery for classical immunological serum markers and discuss advantages and disadvantages for these three platforms in relation to the question addressed.
PDF

Perspective Articles

Lilla Landeck, Monika Lessl, Andreas Busch, Matthias Gottwald, Khusru Asadullah
297 Views, 191 PDF Downloads
Precision medicine aims to treat diseases with special consideration for the individual biological variability. Novel biomarkers (BM) are needed to predict therapeutic responses and to allow for the selection of suitable patients for treatment with certain drugs. However, the identification and validation of appropriate BMs is challenging. Close col-laboration between different partners seems to be a key success factor. While the importance of partnerships and larger, well-established consortia in BM discovery such as the pharmaceutical industry and academic institutions is well un-derstood and has been investigated in the past, the use of open-innovation models, also known as ‘crowd sourcing for biomarkers’, is still in its infancy. Crowd sourcing comprises of a —usually via internet— request for problem solution to an open group of users in a kind of an ‘open call’. The community (crowd) is asked to provide solutions. Since the application of the crowd sourcing method offers the possibility to collect as many as possible novel ideas from a broad community with different expertise, this approach is particularly promising for BM development. In this article we de-scribe the first examples of open-innovation models, such as the ‘grants for targets’ (G4T) and biomarkers initiative ‘InnoCentive’ (innovation/incentive) platform. They may be a fruitful basis for collaborative BM development in the future.
PDF

Editorials

Lilla Landeck, Patricia Carrigan, Khusru Asadullah
131 Views, 163 PDF Downloads
Tremendous expectations have been connected with precision medicine in the past years. Be-side the advantages that this type of therapy offers we should be aware of its challenges too. In this issue we will highlight on specific challenges that the pharmacological industry is opposed with when de-veloping new targeted therapies. In addition, we will discuss issues with the reproducibility of published scientific data.
PDF

Perspective Articles

Bhupinder Bhullar
147 Views, 117 PDF Downloads
Reproducibility is a hallmark of scientific efforts. Estimates indicate that lack of reproducibility of data ranges from 50% to 90% among published research reports. The inability to reproduce major findings of published data confounds new discoveries, and importantly, result in wastage of limited resources in the futile effort to build on these published reports. This poses a challenge to the research community to change the way we approach reproducibility by developing new tools to help progress the reliability of methods and materials we use in our trade.
PDF

Original Articles

Christian Loesche, Frank Kolbinger, Marie-Anne Valentin, Philip Jarvis, Melanie Ceci, Grazyna Wieczorek, Edward Khokhlovich, Irina Koroleva, Gerard Bruin, Frank Sinner, Birgit Aigner, Dhavalkumar D Patel
384 Views, 227 PDF Downloads
Psoriasis is a well characterized interleukin (IL)-17A-driven skin disease with neutrophil infiltration and epidermal hyperkeratosis. Several biomarkers, most prominently β-defensin-2 (BD-2), have been identified using local and systemic invasive measurements as responsive markers of IL-17A-driven skin pathology. We sought to determine whether measurements of epidermal proteins by tape stripping could offer a minimally-invasive method to assess treatment responses. We compared the expression of 170 proteins in the epidermis (tape stripping) and dermis (open flow microperfusion) of 8 psoriatic subjects before and after administration of a single dose of subcutaneous (s.c.) antiIL-17A mAb secukinumab. Proteomic analyses of tape strips revealed a >3-fold decrease in 32 epidermal and inflammatory cell proteins in response to secukinumab. The epidermal proteins with the largest (>10-fold) decreases were: matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8, 15.68-fold, p<0.05); myeloperoxidase (MPO, 14.72-fold, p<0.005); IL-8 (11.93-fold, p<0.05); MMP-9 (10.81-fold, p<0.005); and IL-1β (10.35-fold, p<0.05). For these proteins, greater-fold protein changes were detected in the epidermis compared to dermis. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that neutrophils are the predominant cell type in psoriatic skin lesions that express MPO, MMP-8 and MMP-9, and that secukinumab treatment dramatically decreases neutrophil accumulation. Thus, tape stripping may be used to assess epidermal neutrophils, and protein biomarker responses to anti-IL-17A therapy in psoriasis.
PDF

Review Articles

Thorsten Ruppert, Sabine Sydow, Günter Stock
294 Views, 157 PDF Downloads
In drug research, a serious transformation has taken place. With increasing knowledge gained from molecular medicine, it became possible to refine and develop new therapies based on the molecular mechanisms of diseases. Medicine and drug development have seen a paradigm shift which can be characterized with the catchword “personalized medicine”, also called “stratified medicine” or “precision medicine”. Personalized medicine is based on defined tandems of therapeutic agents and diagnostic tests. With this addition to the regular medical examination of the patient, specific patient characteristics are determined. The results of such diagnostic tests are then decisive for the choice of therapy or control of the effectiveness of the chosen treatment. The benefit of personalized medicine for the patient is the higher probability of treatment success as well as improved effectiveness and reduced / avoided side effects. Health insurance systems and the public may have the advantage that the health funds can be used more efficiently on this basis. This new paradigm requires also a new debate on the remuneration in health care. In order to bring personalized therapies to patients as quickly as possible, all players in health care should work together to address the challenges associated with personalized medicine.
PDF

Perspective Articles

Björn Wallmark
284 Views, 188 PDF Downloads
The article aimed to give a personal perspective on drug discovery and development. The author has worked both in Big Pharma as a scientist and manager and more recently also in start-up biotech companies. Drug companies have played a major important role in improving population health and will continue to do so. The hurdles and costs for drug development have continuously risen without a parallel enhancement of productivity. There is no single explanation for this and the article outlines success factors and hurdles for effective drug development. Aspects of the external and internal environments that influence Big Pharma productivity is outlined and discussed.
PDF

Review Articles

Anton Bespalov, Christoph H Emmerich, Björn Gerlach, Martin C Michel
268 Views, 138 PDF Downloads
Limited reproducibility of preclinical data is increasingly discussed in the literature. Failure of drug devel-opment programs due to lack of clinical efficacy is also of growing concern. The two phenomena may share an important root cause — a lack of robustness in preclinical research. Such a lack of robustness can be a relevant cause of fail-ure in translating preclinical findings into clinical efficacy and hence attrition, and exaggerated cost in drug develop-ment. Apart from the study design and data analysis factors (e.g., insufficient sample sizes, failure to implement blind-ing, and randomization), heterogeneity among experimental models (e.g., animal strains) and the conditions of the study used between different laboratories is a major contributor to the lacking of robustness of research findings. The flipside of this coin is that the understanding of the causes of heterogeneity across experimental models may lead to the identification of relevant factors for defining the responder populations. Thus, this heterogeneity within preclinical find-ings could be an asset, rather than an obstacle, for precision medicine. To enable this paradigm shift, several steps need to be taken to identify conditions under which drugs do not work. An improved granularity in the reporting of preclini-cal studies is central among them (i.e., details about the study design, experimental conditions, quality of tools and rea-gents, validation of assay conditions, etc.). These actions need to be discussed jointly by the research communities in-terested in preclinical data robustness and precision medicine. Thus, we propose that a lack of robustness due to the heterogeneity across models and conditions of the study is not necessarily a liability for biomedical research but can be transformed into an asset of precision medicine.
PDF
Read more

Indexing and Archiving

Editorial Board

Editor-in-Chief

Prof. Khusru Asadullah Medical School Charite Germany

Editorial Board Members

Prof. Alain van Gool Radboud Technology Centers Netherlands
Dr. Arne Von Bonin AFFiRiS AG Austria
Prof. Arnold von Eckardstein University of Zurich Switzerland
Dr. Birgitte Søgaard H Lundbeck Denmark
Prof. Burkert Mathias Pieske University Medicine Berlin Germany
Dr. Dhavalkumar D. Patel Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research Switzerland
Dr. Felix Frueh Opus Three LLC United States
Dr. Frank Diehl Sysmex Corporation Germany
Prof. Fuquan Yang Chinese Academy of Sciences China
Prof. Ping-Jin Gao Jiao Tong University School of Medicine China
Prof. Grant Gallagher HUMIGEN LLC United States
Prof. Hans-Dieter Volk Labor Berlin Charité Vivantes Germany
Dr. Joachim Reischl AstraZeneca Sweden
Prof. Klaus Pantel University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf Germany
Dr. Lilla Landeck Ernst von Bergmann General Hospital Germany
Dr. Martin Armstrong UCB Belgium
Ms. Mya Thomae Illumina United States
Dr. Patricia Carrigan Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals Germany
Prof. Petra Reinke Nephrology, CVK Germany
Prof. Rainer Bischoff University of Groningen Netherlands
Dr. Richard Watts QIAGEN United States
Dr. Robert Holland Early Clinical Development Consulting Limited United Kingdom
Dr. Sarah Byron NICE's Diagnostics Assessment Programme United Kingdom
Dr. Scott Kennedy Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research United States
Dr. Thomas Steckler Janssen Research & Development Belgium
Prof. Zusen Fan CAS Key Laboratory of Infection and Immunity China

Focus and Scope

The journal, Advances in Precision Medicine (APM) brings together all aspects of the rapidly growing field of personalized/ precision medicine. 

Biomarkers are a key focus of APM’s scope. In particular, papers on stratification biomarkers and companion diagnostics enabling personalized medicine are highly welcome. Other categories of biomarkers accepted for consideration include pharmacodynamic biomarkers demonstrating target engagement which are potentially useful for dose finding, safety biomarkers to exclude patients with high risk for side effects or to detect induction of adverse effects early, and disease biomarkers which can be used for diagnosis, as surrogate endpoints, or to determine early response to therapy. 

All stages in Biomarker Discovery (research and development) as well as its utilization, i.e. identification, validation and application will be covered. Apart from biomarkers and according assays, novel technologies, strategic and general aspects are of interest too. This includes approaches for marker/assay/device development strategies, collaborative approaches and regulatory aspects with impact on personalized medicine. Novel therapies, even if not guided by biomarkers, may be considered if they specifically target a particular molecule and/or a special patient subpopulation. Validation studies are highly encouraged. APM will also consider publishing negative data.

The target audiences of APM are the scientific and healthcare communities of basic scientists and clinicians from academia, regulatory institutions, and industry. This includes pharma, diagnostic and device companies.

Articles include original articles, reviews, perspectives, editorials, commentaries, position papers, conference reports and letters to the editor. The journal welcomes unsolicited article proposals in all categories except for “Editorials”. Authors are encouraged to refer to APM’s “Section Policies” for more information.

APM provides a vital forum for the exchange of important information in all areas of personalized medicine and biomarker research, development and application.

We are devoted to making APM a high-quality, frequently cited journal that publishes superior scholarly articles and disseminates the latest advances in the field.

For Authors

  • A manuscript would not be accepted if it has been published or is currently under consideration for publication in any other journals. The author will need to notify the editorial team if the data in their submission has been presented in conferences.

  • Authorship should be limited to people who have contributed substantially to the work. Authors must indicate their specific contributions to the published work. This information should be listed in the manuscript under the section ‘Author Contribution’. Examples of contributions include: designed research, performed research, contributed new reagents or analytic tools, analyzed data, wrote the paper.

    For more information on submission’s format, please refer to the ‘Author Guidelines’ link accessible from the ‘About’ button at the top row of this page.

    The corresponding author should be clearly indicated for all manuscripts submitted. A maximum of two corresponding authors are allowed for the responsibilities associated. The corresponding author(s) is responsible for:

    • Obtaining permission from all the authors mentioned in the manuscript
    • Ensuring adherence to all editorial and submission policies and for any communications and actions that may be necessary after publication
    • Including written permission from the authors of the work concerned for any mention of any unpublished material included in the manuscript, e.g. data from manuscripts-in-press, personal communication, or work in preparation.
  • The author has to provide the authorization of no conflict with any financial body or funding agency that might influence the results or interpretation of their manuscript. All authors, members, reviewers and editors must disclose any association that poses a conflict of interest in connection with the manuscript. The corresponding author will be asked to sign a form behalf of all of the authors regarding potential conflicts of interest at the time of acceptance.

  • The editorial team does not approve of any plagiarism attempts. iThenticate will be utilized at the editor’s discretion to verify the originality of submitted manuscripts. If plagiarism is detected during the review process the manuscript may be rejected pending the severity of plagiarism. Therefore, if a manuscript uses a text copied directly from another source, this text must be written in quotation marks and the original source must be cited.

  • All articles must be written in English — preferably American English. SI units should be used. If you are not a native English speaker, you may want to utilize an external or Whioce Publishing’s optional professional language editing service before submitting the final version.

  • Whioce Publishing Pte Ltd offers its own professional editing services. By using this service, you can be sure that your English-language manuscript will be polished and ready for submission to your publication of choice at a very reasonable price. For further details about the Language Editing Services, please contact us at editorial@whioce.com. Please note that utilizing a language editing service is not a guarantee of acceptance.

  • Revised manuscripts must contain a detailed point by point response to the comments of the reviewers. The response to reviewers has to be uploaded as a separate file.

  • If you withdraw your manuscript after it has been accepted (but not yet published), you will be charged for costs incurred at USD200.

  • Authors are expected to have minimum amount of post-acquisition processing of data. In case of processing; alterations must be applied to the entire image (e.g., brightness, contrast, color balance). Any kind of alteration if being done has to be clearly stated in the figure legend and in Methods section.

    Grouping of data (e.g., cropping of images of removal of lanes from gels and bolts) must be made apparent and should be explicitly indicated in the appropriate figure legends. Data comparisons should only be made from comparative experiments, and individual data should not be utilized across multiple figures. If inappropriate image/data manipulation is identified after publication, we reserve the right to ask for the original data and, if that is not satisfactory, to issue a correction or retract the paper, as appropriate.

  • Whioce Publishing will preserve e-journals with Portico, ensuring that they will be secure and available into the future.

  • Author Guidelines

    Aims & Scope

    The journal,Advances in Precision Medicine (APM) bring stogether all aspects of the rapidly growing field of personalized/precision medicine.

    Biomarkers are a key focus of APM’s scope. In particular, papers on stratification biomarkers and companion diagnostics enabling personalized medicine are highly welcome. Other categories of biomarkers accepted for consideration include pharmacodynamic biomarkers demonstrating target engagement which are potentially useful for dose finding, safety biomarkers to exclude patients with high risk for side effects or to detect induction of adverse effects early, and disease biomarkers which can be used for diagnosis, as surrogate endpoints, or to determine early response to therapy.

    All stages in Biomarker Discovery (research and development) as well as its utilization, i.e. identification, validation and application will be covered. Apart from biomarkers and according assays, novel technologies, strategic and general aspects are of interest too. This includes approaches for marker/assay/device development strategies, collaborative approaches and regulatory aspects with impact on personalized medicine. Novel therapies, even if not guided by biomarkers, may be considered if they specifically target a particular molecule and/or a special patient subpopulation. Validation studies are highly encouraged. APM will also consider publishing negative data.

    The target audiencesof APM are the scientific and healthcare communities of basic scientists and clinicians from academia, regulatory institutions, and industry. This includes pharma, diagnostic and device companies.

    Articles include original articles, reviews, perspectives, editorials, commentaries, position papers, conference reports and letters tothe editor. The journal welcomes unsolicited article proposals in all categories except for “Editorials”. Authors are encouraged to refer to APM’s “Section Policies” for more information.

    APM provides a vital forum for the exchange of important information in all areas of personalized medicine and biomarker research, development and application.

    We are devoted to making APM a high-quality, frequently cited journal that publishes superior scholarly articles and disseminates the latest advances in the field.

    Section categories

    The types of articles accepted for consideration include original articles, reviews, perspectives, editorials, commentaries, position papers, conference reports and letters to the editor.

    Original Articles

    Scientific articles on original basic and applied research and/or analysis.
    This manuscript type typically has 5 tables and figures in total, and approximately 40 references and 7,000 words (inclusive of reference list and abstract)

    Checked Open SubmissionsChecked IndexedChecked Peer Reviewed

    Review Articles

    A summary highlighting recent developments and current/future trends of the field.
    This manuscript type typically has 5 tables and figures in total, and approximately 70 references and 7,000 words (inclusive of reference list and abstract).

    Checked Open SubmissionsChecked IndexedChecked Peer Reviewed

    Perspective Articles

    These are author’s personal opinions on a subject/topic. Unlike Reviews, Perspective Articles may cover a more specific, narrow part of the field. However, these manuscripts are still required to uphold the spirit of academia to be objective as well as aim to initiate or further discussions and novel experimental procedures in the field. 
    This manuscript type typically has 5 tables and figures in total, and approximately 40 references and 5,000 words (inclusive of reference list and abstract).

    Checked Open SubmissionsChecked IndexedChecked Peer Reviewed

    Letters to the Editor-in-Chief

    Comments from reader(s) about individual articles. These letters must be constructive and contribute to the development of individual articles published or the entire journal. Letters containing new ideas, supporting data or data criticizing any articles may be subjected to peerreview (determined on a case-by-case basis by the journal’s editorial team) and published in the online publication but not in the printed version. 
    This manuscript type typically has 1,800 words (exclusive of reference list)

    Checked Open SubmissionsChecked IndexedUnchecked Peer Reviewed

    Editorials

    Solicited concise commentary highlighting prominent topics in the journal issue. These are the official opinions of the editors of the journal or special issue. Editorials will be published in both the online and printed versions of the journal.
    This manuscript type typically has 3,500 words. Authors are welcome to propose ideas/themes to the Editor-in-Chief.

    Unchecked Open SubmissionsChecked IndexedUnchecked Peer Reviewed

    Commentaries

    Unsolicited commentaries or analysis from reader(s) targeting specific published articles in the journal. Commentaries will be subjected to peerreview and may be published in both online and printed versions of the journal. 
    This manuscript type typically has 3,500 words.

    Checked Open SubmissionsChecked IndexedUnchecked Peer Reviewed

    Conference reports

    Solicited reports from topic-related conferences, meetings, and congresses that are of interest to readers such as novel trendsand perspectives. Such reports will be subjected to peerreview and may be published in both online and printed versions of the journal. Authors are welcome to propose ideas for such articles to the Editor-in-Chief for consideration.

    This manuscript type typically has 3,500 words.

    Unchecked Open SubmissionsChecked IndexedChecked Peer Reviewed

    Position Papers

    Submissions that reflect the official opinion of an organization (e.g. government bodies, funding agencies etc.)

    This manuscript type typically has 3,500 words.

    Checked Open SubmissionsChecked IndexedChecked Peer Reviewed

    Manuscript Format

    Your manuscript should be in MS Word or LaTeX format. You are advised to download the document, Instructions for Typesetting Manuscript, as a template or for more details on preparing your submissions for consideration.

    All manuscripts must be written in clear, comprehensible English. Usage of non-English words should be kept to a minimum and all must be italicized, except for “e.g.” and “i.e.” If you have concerns about the level of English in your submission, please ensure that it is proofread before submission by a native English speaker or a scientific editing service.

    Cover letter

    All submissions should include a cover letter as a separate file. A cover letter should contain a brief explanation of what was previously known, the conceptual advancement with the findings and its significance to broad readership. The cover letter is confidential and will be read only by the editors. It will not be seen by reviewers.

    Title

    The title should capture the conceptual significance for a broad audience. The title should not be more than 50 words and should be able to give readers an overall view of the paper’s significance. Titles should avoid using uncommon jargons, abbreviations and punctuation.

    List of Authors

    The names of authors must be spelled out rather than set in initials (except for middle names) along with their affiliations in full. Authors should be listed according to the extent of their contribution, with the major contributor listed first. All corresponding authors should be identified with an asterisk. Affiliations should contain the following core information: department, institution, city, state, postal code, and country. Only the email address of one corresponding author must be included within the manuscript. However, during the online submission process, submitters should provide a phone contact (office/personal) for urgent communication purposes between author and publisher only. Please note that all authors must see and approve the final version of the manuscript before submitting.

    Abstract

    Articles must include an abstract containing a maximum of 200 words. The purpose of abstract is to provide sufficient information for a reader to determine whether or not to proceed to the full text of the article. After the abstract, please give 5–8 key words; please avoid using the same words as those already used in the title.

    Section Headings

    Please number the section headings (e.g. 1234, etc.) in boldface. Likewise, use boldface to identify subheadings too but please distinguish it from major headings using numbers (e.g. 1.11.22.12.2, etc.) Further subsections of subheadings should be differentiated by non-boldface font with the numbers in parenthesis: (1), (2), (3), etc.

    Introduction

    Introduction should provide a background that gives a broad readership an overall outlook of the field and the research performed. It tackles a problem and states its important regarding with the significance of the study. Introduction can conclude with a brief statement of the aim of the work and a comment about whether that aim was achieved.

    Materials and Methods

    This section provides the general experimental design and methodologies used. The aim is to provide enough detail to for other investigators to fully replicate your results. It is also required to facilitate better understanding of the results obtained. Protocols and procedures for new methods must be included in detail to reproduce the experiments.

    Ethics

    Ethics information, including Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) permit numbers and/or Institutional Review Board (IRB) name, if applicable. This information should be included in a subheading labeled "Ethics Statement" in the "Methods" section of your manuscript file, in as much detail as possible.

    Results

    This section can be divided into subheadings; please refer to the section above: Section headings. This section focuses on the results of the experiments performed.

    Discussion

    This section should provide the significance of the results and identify the impact of the research in a broader context. It should not be redundant or similar to the content of the results section.

    Conclusion

    Please use the conclusion section for interpretation only, and not to summarize information already presented in the text or abstract.

    Author Contributions

    This section describes the contribution of each author, designated by initials. For the case of co-first authors, description of each author’s contribution is required.

    Conflict of Interest

    All authors are required to declare all activities that have the potential to be deemed as a source of competing interest in relations to their submitted manuscript. Examples of such activities could include personal or work-related relationships, events, etc. Authors who have nothing to declare are encouraged to add "No conflict of interest was reported by all authors" in this section.

    Funding

    Authors should declare all financial and non-financial support that have the potential to be deemed as a source of competing interest in relations to their submitted manuscript in this section. Financial supports are generally in the form of grants, royalties, consulting fees and more. Examples of non-financial support could include the following: externally-supplied equipments/biological sources, writing assistance, administrative support, contributions from non-authors etc. If there is no funding to declare, authors should indicate as such rather than erase this section from their manuscript.

    Appendix

    This section is optional and is for all materials (e.g. advanced technical details) that has been excluded from the main text but remain essential to readers in understanding the manuscripts. This section is not for supplementary figures/information. Authors are advised to refer to the section on ‘Supplementary information’ for such submissions.

    Text

    The text of the manuscript should be in Microsoft Word or LaTeX. The length of the manuscript cannot be more than 50000 characters (inclusive of spaces) or approximately 7000 words.

    Nomenclature for genes and proteins

    This journal aims to reach researchers all over the globe. Hence, for both reviewers’ and readers’ ease in comprehension, authors are highly encourage to use the appropriate gene and protein nomenclature. Authors may prefer to utilize resources such as http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene

    Figures

    Authors should include all figures into the manuscript and submit it as 1 file in the OJS system. Figures include photographs, scanned images, graphs, charts and schematic diagrams. Figures submitted should avoid unnecessary decorative effects (e.g. 3D graphs) as well as be minimally processed (e.g. changes in brightness and contrast applied uniformly for the entire figure). It should also be set against a white background. Please remember to label all figures (e.g. axis etc.) and add in captions (below the figure) as required. These captions should be numbered (e.g. Figure 1Figure 2, etc.) in boldface. All figures must have a brief title (also known as caption) that describes the entire figure without citing specific panels, followed by a legend defined as descriptionof each panel. Please identify each panel with uppercase letters in parenthesis (e.g. (A), (B), (C), etc.)

    The preferred file formats for any separately submitted figure(s) are TIFF or JPEG. All figures should be legible in print form and of optimal resolution. Optimal resolutions preferred are 300 dots per inch for RBG coloured600 dots per inch for greyscale and 1200 dots per inch for line art. Although there are no file size limitation imposed, authors are highly encouraged to compress their figures to an ideal size without unduly affecting legibility and resolution of figures. This will also speed up the process of uploading in the submission system.

    The Editor-in-Chief and Publisher reserve the right to request from author(s) the high-resolution files and unprocessed data and metadata files should the need arise at any point after manuscript submission for reasons such as production, evaluation or other purposes. The file name should allow for ease in identifying the associated manuscript submitted.

    Tables, lists and equations

    Tables created using Microsoft word table function are preferred. The tables should include a title. Titles and footnotes/legends should be concise. These must be submitted together with the manuscript. Likewise, lists and equations should be properly aligned and its meaning clear to readers.

    Supplementary information

    This section is optional and contains all materials and figures that have been excluded from the entire manuscript. These information are relevant to the manuscript but remains non-essential to readers’ understanding of the manuscript’s main content. All supplementary information should be submitted as a separate file in Step 4 during submission. Please ensure the names of such files contain ‘suppl. info’.

    In-text citations

    Reference citations in the text should be numbered consecutively in superscript square brackets. Some examples:

    a) Negotiation research spans many disciplines[3,4].

    b) This result was later contradicted by Becker and Seligman[5].

    c) This effect has been widely studied[1–3,7].

    Personal communications and unpublished works can only be used in the main text of the submission and are not to be placed in the Reference section. Authors are advised to limit such usage to the minimum. They should also be easily identifiable by stating the authors and year of such unpublished works or personal communications and the word ‘Unpublished’ in parenthesis.

    E.g. (Smith J, 2000, Unpublished)

    References

    This section is compulsory and should be placed at the end of all manuscripts. Do not use footnotes or endnotes as a substitute for a reference list. The list of references should only include works that are cited in the text and that have been published or accepted for publication. Personal communications and unpublished works should be excluded from this section.

    For references in reference list, all authors must be stated. Authors referenced are listed with their surname followed by their initials. All references should be numbered (e.g. 1. 2. 3. etc.) and sequenced according to the order it appears as an in-text citation. References should follow the following pattern: Author(s) followed by year of publication, title of publication, standard full journal name in italics, volume number, issue number in parenthesis and lastly, page range. If the referred article has more than three authors, list only the first three authors and abbreviate the remaining authors to italicized ‘et al.’ (meaning: "and others").

    Examples:

    Journal

    Journal article (print) with one to three authors

    Younger P, 2004, Using the internet to conduct a literature search. Nursing Standard, vol.19(6): 45–51. 
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1222/j.1111-2648.2007.043435.

    Journal article (print) with more than three authors

    Gamelin F X, Baquet G, Berthoin S, et al. 2009, Effect of high intensity intermittent training on heart rate variability in prepubescent children. European Journal of Applied Physiology, vol.105: 731–738. 
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1222/jhge-2648.2007.0434354.he.

    Journal article (online) with one to three authors

    Jackson D, Firtko A and Edenborough M, 2007, Personal resilience as a strategy for surviving and thriving in the face of workplace adversity: a literature review. Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol.60(1): 1–9. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2648.2007.04412.x.

    Journal article (online) with more than three authors

    Hargreave M, Jensen A, Nielsen T S S, et al. 2015, Maternal use of fertility drugs and risk of cancer in children-A nationwide population-based cohort study in Denmark. International Journal of Cancer, vol.136(8): 1931–1939. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.29235.

    Journal article (in press/forthcoming) with one to three authors

    Younger P, 2004, Using the internet to conduct a literature search. Nursing Standard, vol.19(6): 45–51. (In press)
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1222/j.1111-2648.2007.043435.

    Note: 'In press'in this section refers to articles published online and with a valid Digital Object Identifier (preferred) or url but have not yet been assigned to any issue nor has been printed; electronic-only journals and its articles are not counted as ‘in press’. Authors should refer to the format for online documents in cases of electronic-only resources.

    Book

    Book with one to three authors

    Schneider Z, Whitehead D and Elliott D, 2007, Nursing and midwifery research: methods and appraisal for evidence-based practice. 3rd edn, Elsevier Australia, Marrickville, NSW

    Book with more than three authors

    Davis M, Charles L, Curry M J, et al. 2003, Challenging spatial norms. Routledge, London

    Chapter or Article in Book

    Knowles M S, 1986, Independent study, in Using learning contracts. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, 89–96.

    Book with one to three authors (in press/forthcoming)

    Posner M I and Rothbart M K, 2007, Educating the human brain. American Psychological Association, Washington. (In press)

    Chapter or Article in Book(in press/forthcoming)

    Zimmermann S, Chai L and Wang X, 2015, Progress of electrospinning in organ manufacturing, in Organ Manufacturing. Nova Science Publishers Inc, New York.(In press)
    Note: 'In press' in this sectionrefers tobooks/book chapters that havenot been printed but that the Publisher has plans to produce print copies; electronic-only books and its chapters are not counted as ‘in press’. Authors should refer to the format for online documents in cases of electronic-only resources.

    Others

    Proceedings of meetings and symposiums, conference papers

    Chang S S, Liaw L and Ruppenhofer J (eds), 2000, Proceedings of the twenty-fifth annual meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society, February 1215, 1999: general session and parasession on loan word phenomena. Berkeley Linguistics Society, Berkeley.

    Conference proceedings (from electronic database)

    Bukowski R M, 2009, Prognostic factors for survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma, Innovations and challenges in renal cancer: proceedings of the third Cambridge conference, Cancer, vol.115(10): 2273, viewed May19, 2009, Academic OneFile database.

    Online Document with author names

    Este J, Warren C, Connor L, et al. 2008, Life in the clickstream: the future of journalism, Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance, viewed May 27, 2009, http://www.alliance.org.au/documents/ foj_report_final.pdf

    Online Document without author name

    Developing an argument n.d., viewed March 30, 2009, http://web.princeton.edu/sites/writing/Writing_Center/WCWritingResources.htm

    Thesis/Dissertation

    Gale L, 2000, The relationship between leadership and employee empowerment for successful total quality management, thesis, Penrith, University of Western Sydney, viewed March 31, 2009, Australasian Digital Thesis database.

    Standard

    Standards Australia Online 2006, Glass in buildings: selection and installation, AS 1288–2006, amended 31 January 2008, viewed May19, 2009, SAI Global database.

    Government Report

    National Commission of Audit 1996, Report to the Commonwealth Government, Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra.

    Government report (online)

    Department of Health and Ageing 2008, Ageing and aged care in Australia, viewed November 10, 2008, http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/ageing

    Patent

    Rencher W, 1995, Biocompatible drug delivery gel containing mixture of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose, xanthan gum and/or alginates, diluent. US Patent 5192802 A.

    No author

    Guide to agricultural meteorological practices 1981, 2nd edn, Secretariat of the World Meteorological Organization, Geneva.

    Note: When referencing an entry from a dictionary or an encyclopedia with no author there is no requirement to include the source in the reference list. In these cases, only cite the title and year of the source in-text. For an authored dictionary/encyclopedia, treat the source as an authored book.

  • Authors contributing to Advances in Precision Medicine agree to publish their articles under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 International License, allowing third parties to share their work (copy, distribute, transmit) and to adapt it, under the condition that the authors are given credit, that the work is not used for commercial purposes, and that in the event of reuse or distribution, the terms of this license are made clear.
  • The names and email addresses entered in this journal site will be used exclusively for the stated purposes of this journal and will not be made available for any other purpose or to any other party.

Article Processing Charges (APC)

Advances in Precision Medicine is an Open Access Journal under Whioce Publishing. All articles published in Advances in Precision Medicine are accessible electronically from the journal website without commencing any kind of payment. In order to ensure contents are freely available and maintain publishing quality, Article Process Charges (APC) is applicable to all authors who wish to submit their articles to the journal to cover the cost incurred in processing the manuscripts. Such cost will cover the peer-review, copyediting, typesetting, publishing, content depositing and archiving processes. Those charges are applicable only to authors who have their manuscript successfully accepted after peer-review.

Journal TitleAPC
Advances in Precision Medicine$800

We encourage authors to publish their papers with us and don’t wish the cost of article processing fees to be a barrier especially to authors from the low and lower middle income countries/regions. A range of discounts or waivers are offered to authors who are unable to pay our publication processing fees. Authors can write in to apply for a waiver and requests will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Authors based in these countries/regions listed below may apply to receive up to a 50%-100% waiver of the standard article processing fee; Waiver subjected to approval.

  • Afghanistan
  • Armenia
  • Bangladesh
  • Benin
  • Bhutan
  • Bolivia
  • Burkina Faso
  • Burundi
  • Cabo Verde
  • Cambodia
  • Cameroon
  • Central African Republic
  • Chad
  • Comoros
  • Congo, Dem. Rep
  • Congo, Rep.
  • Côte d'Ivoire
  • Djibouti
  • Egypt, Arab Rep.
  • El Salvador
  • Eritrea
  • Ethiopia
  • Gambia, The
  • Ghana
  • Guatemala
  • Guinea
  • Guinea-Bissau
  • Haiti
  • Honduras
  • India
  • Indonesia
  • Kenya
  • Kiribati
  • Korea, Dem. People's Rep.
  • Kosovo
  • Kyrgyz Republic
  • Lao PDR
  • Lesotho
  • Liberia
  • Madagascar
  • Malawi
  • Mali
  • Mauritania
  • Micronesia, Fed. Sts.
  • Moldova
  • Mongolia
  • Morocco
  • Mozambique
  • Myanmar
  • Nepal
  • Nicaragua
  • Niger
  • Nigeria
  • Pakistan
  • Papua New Guinea
  • Philippines
  • Rwanda
  • Samoa
  • São Tomé and Principe
  • Senegal
  • Sierra Leone
  • Solomon Islands
  • Somalia
  • South Sudan
  • Sri Lanka
  • Sudan
  • Swaziland
  • Syrian Arab Republic
  • Tajikistan
  • Tanzania
  • Timor-Leste
  • Togo
  • Tonga
  • Tunisia
  • Uganda
  • Ukraine
  • Uzbekistan
  • Vanuatu
  • Vietnam
  • West Bank and Gaza
  • Yemen, Rep.
  • Zambia
  • Zimbabwe

If you are residing in one of the above mentioned countries and need to apply for a waiver, please email our editorial department (editorial@whioce.com) with the following information:

  • Your name and institution with full address details
  • Title of journal you wish to submit a manuscript to
  • Reason for applying for a waiver
  • Title of your paper
  • Country of residence of all co-author

APC Payment

Payments for APC of this journal can be made through our online PayPal payment gateway. Enter the article no. into the below textbox and select "Pay Now" to proceed with payment.

Article No.

*Article No. is mandatory for payment and it can be found on the acceptance letter issued by the Editorial Office. Payment without indicating Article No. will result in processing problem and delay in article processing. Please note that payments will be processed in USD. You can make payment through Masters, Visa or UnionPay card.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Answer: To establish whether your paper is suitable for this journal, please read Focus and Scope under Editorial Policies.
  • Answer: Registration and login are required to submit manuscript online and to check the status of current submission.
  • Answer: The submission file can be submitted in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, RTF, or WordPerfect document file format.
  • Answer: The length of the manuscript cannot be more than 8000 words.
  • Answer: The cover letter is necessary for each submission. The cover letter should be uploaded as a separate file in Step 4 during the submission. The contents of the cover letter should include brief explanation of what was previously known, the conceptual advancement with the findings and its significance to broad readership. The cover letter will only be visible to the editor. Reviewers will not have access to the cover letter.
  • Answer: You can suggest 2 reviewers for your submission. However, the decision of whether to invite them lies with the Editor.
  • Answer: This journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge. Refer to the Publication Fees tab for more details.

Announcements

 
No announcements have been published.
 
More Announcements...