Environment and Social Psychology

ISSN: 2424-8975 (Online)

ISSN: 2424-7979 (Print)

Journal Abbreviation: Environ Soc Psychol

Publication Frequency: bi-annual

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Publishing Model: Open Access

Journal no: 8P

About the Journal

The main goal of ESP is to explore the linkages between the environment and the human condition and promote environmental awareness and behavior that are crucial to sustainable development and human development. Using an interdisciplinary approach, synthesis theory, research and practice, we try to:

  1. Examine the possibility of human and social development as a credible paradigm for scientific inquiry and dialogue and promote world peace, prosperity and progress in a precarious and complex world.
  2. Transcend the contradictions and dualities of contemporary ideology and method, and move toward a unified social psychology research framework.
  3. Promote the academic pursuit of the pursuit of knowledge, seek empirical evidence and truth, and support environmental justice as a feasible paradigm conducive to the development of human society.
  4. Solving Social Psychological Barriers - Beliefs, Attitudes, Stereotypes, Prejudices, Habits and Political Culture Practices - Defeat Quality Education and Learning Beyond Contemporary Dogma at Behavioral Schools.
  5. Interface approach to understanding and resolving contemporary nihilism, hatching a psychopathology of self-destructive addiction - sexual abuse, substance and drugs, interpersonal violence and ineffective dysfunction - and the breeding of confusion, mass murder and terror.

Announcements

 

You act most like 'you' in a time crunch, study finds

 

When they must act quickly, selfish people are likely to act more selfishly than usual, while pro-social people behave even more pro-socially, a new study found.

The results suggest that when people don't have much time to make a decision, they go with what they've done in similar situations, said Ian Krajbich, co-author of the study and assistant professor of psychology and economics at The Ohio State University.

"People start off with a bias of whether it is best to be selfish or pro-social. If they are rushed, they'll tend to go with that bias," Krajbich said.

 
Posted: 2018-09-11
 

Smiling doesn't necessarily mean you're happy

 

Smiling does not necessarily indicate that we are happy, according to new research at Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS).

It is widely believed that smiling means a person is happy, and it usually occurs when they are engaging with another person or group of people. However, a new study led by body language expert Dr Harry Witchel, Discipline Leader in Physiology at BSMS, shows this is not always the case.

Dr Witchel claims that the way people often behave during one-to-one Human-Computer-Interaction (HCI) is as if they were socially engaged.

 
Posted: 2018-09-11
 

The universality of shame

 

Shame on you. These three simple words can have devastating effect on an individual's psyche.

But why is that? How is the feeling of shame generated, and what is its purpose? Some theorists argue that feeling shame is a pathology, a condition to be cured. Others dismiss it as a useless, ugly emotion.

A research team at the University of Montreal and UC Santa Barbara's Center for Evolutionary Psychology (CEP), however, suggest something altogether different. Shame, they argue, was built into human nature by evolution because it served an important function for our foraging ancestors.

 
Posted: 2018-09-11
 
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