Family size preferences among women in a union in Nigeria and associated factors

Authors

  • Lorretta Favour Chizomam Ntoimo Federal University Oye-Ekiti, Nigeria

Keywords:

Fertility preferences, Ideal family size, Fertility, Women, Family size preferences

Abstract

Nigeria’s population is currently estimated at 216million and the country will be the third most populous in the world in 2050. A major driver of the high population growth is persistent high fertility. This study examined women’s fertility preferences, which was measured with ideal family size (IFS) and the associated factors. Data were obtained from the 2018 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey. The analysis consisted of a weighted sample of 13, 673 women in union, aged 15–49 years whose first marriage took place within 10 years before the survey. Descriptive and multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted. The proportion of respondents whose IFS was 5+ was 65%. Slightly above one-quarter had IFS of four children, and 11% had IFS of 0 – 3. IFS of 5+ was significantly associated with women resident in the Northern and Southeast regions, rural residents, Muslims, women who had no education, women working in agriculture, sales/service jobs, those who participated in one or two out of four household decisions, justified wife beating, have 5+ siblings, experienced child death, and married before age 20. Efforts to achieve the target reduction in total fertility rate in Nigeria should be multi-sectoral targeting these subpopulations of women.  

References

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Laplante B, Castro-Martín T, Cortina C, et al. (2016). The contributions of childbearing within marriage and within consensual union to fertility in Latin America, 1980-2010. Demographic Research, 34:827-844. https://doi.org/10.4054/DemRes.2016.34.29

Mberu BU and Reed HE. (2014). Understanding subgroup fertility differentials in Nigeria. Population Review, 53(2):23-46. https://doi. org/10.1353%2Fprv.2014.0006

Mencarini L and Tanturri ML. (2006). High fertility or childlessness: Micro-level determinants of reproductive behaviour in Italy. Population, 61(4):389-415. https://doi.org/10.3917/popu.604.0463

Mohanty SK, Fink G, Chauhan RK, et al. (2016). Distal determinants of fertility decline: Evidence from 640 Indian districts. Demographic Research, 34:373-406. https://doi.org/10.4054/DemRes.2016.34.13

Morosow K and Trappe H. (2018). Intergenerational transmission of fertility timing in Germany. Demographic Research, 38:1389- 1422. https://doi.org/10.4054/DemRes.2018.38.46

Muhoza DN, Broekhuis A, and Hooimeijer P. (2014). Variations in desired family size and excess fertility in East Africa. International Journal of Population Research, 2014(1):1-11. https://doi.org/doi.org/10.1155/2014/486079

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National Population Commission of Nigeria and Health Policy Project. (2015). Nigeria’s 2004 National Policy on Population for Sustainable Development: Implementation Assessment Report. Mumbai: Futures Group, Health Policy Project.

NPC and ICF International. (2014). Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey 2013. National Population Commission. United States: Nigeria and ICF International.

NPC and ICF Macro. (2009). Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey 2008. United States: National Population Commission, Nigeria and ICF Macro.

Ntoimo LF and Isiugo-Abanihe U. (2014). Patriarchy and singlehood among women in Lagos, Nigeria. Journal of Family Issues, 35(14):1980-2008. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F0192513X13511249

Nwokocha EE. (2007). Male-child syndrome and the agony of motherhood among the Igbo of Nigeria. International Journal of Sociology of the Family, 33(1):219-234.

Odusina EK, Ayotunde T, Kunnuji M, et al. (2020). Fertility preferences among couples in Nigeria: A cross sectional study. Reproductive Health, 17(1):92. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12978-020-00940-9

Olaseinde OS, Owagbemi OG, Aruna JO, et al. (2022). Fertility intentions among high-parity women in Nigeria: How satisfying are four living children? Journal of Population and Social Studies, 30:488-507. https://doi.org/10.25133/JPSSv302022.028

Oyediran K and Isiugo-Abanihe U. (2002). Husband-wife communication and couples fertility desires among the Yoruba of Nigeria. African Population Studies/Etude de La Population Africaine, 17(2):61-80.

Oyediran KA. (2006). Fertility desires of yoruba couples of South-Western Nigeria. Journal of Biosocial Science, 38(5):605-624. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0021932004026835 s

Pallant J. (2020). SPSS Survival Manual: A Step by Step Guide to Data Analysis Using IBM SPSS. England: Routledge.

Pullu TW, Schoumaker B, Becker S, et al. (2013). An Assessment of DHS Estimates of Fertility and under-five Mortality. In: International Population Conference of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP), Session 132: Data Quality in Demographic Surveys.

Rossi P and Rouanet L. (2015). Gender preferences in Africa: A comparative analysis of fertility choices. World Development, 72:326-345. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.worlddev.2015.03.010

Silalahi PC and Setyonaluri D. (2018). My mother, my role model: Mother’s influence on women’s fertility intention in Indonesia. Malaysian Journal of Economic Studies, 55(1):81-96. https://doi.org/10.3316/informit.626563682534954

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2022-08-24